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Voice Clips

The Folk Music Archives  "Voice Clips" are from recent interviews in  RealPlayer streaming audio.

Voice Clips are also on pages throughout the web site by song, subject or artist.

The "Voice Clips" below are about the song: " Where Have All The Flowers Gone." The first verses were written by Pete Seeger, the last two by Joe Hickerson.   It was sung at a Boston coffee house by Peter, Paul & Mary and first recorded by The Kingston Trio.

Archival Note: It took Folk Music Archives three years to interview, edit and produce the interviews. These four segments are from seven hours of archival programs.

Click On Voice Clips Below
 
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Pete Seeger talking about Where Have All The Flowers Gone.
and how he got the idea to write the first few verses
while on a plane to Oberlin College in 1955.


Pete Seeger talking about the two verses Joe Hickerson added to
Where Have All The Flowers Gone and sings the last verse.

Joe Hickerson talking about Where Have All The Flowers Gone,
The Kingston Trio, Peter, Paul & Mary
 and he sings some verses.


John Stewart and Nick Reynolds of The Kingston Trio
talk about learning Where Have All The Flowers Gone
from Peter, Paul & Mary in Boston and recording it first.

Interview Locations: Pete Seeger: His cabin home, Beacon, New York.
Joe Hickerson: Library of Congress American Folklife Center, Washington, D.C.
Kingston Trio: San Antonio, Texas and New York City.

You are able to hear personal stories on
Where Have All The Flower Gone, Tom Dooley, Stewball, McCarthy Blacklisting, Bob Dylan "Plugged-In" at the Newport Folk Festival, Paul Robeson, Oscar Brand, Odetta, The Smothers Brothers, Jean Ritchie, Tom Paxton, Tom Rush, Dave Van Ronk, Josh White, Jr. and many other interview segments.

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All "VoiceClips" are the copyright and intellectual property of Folk Music Archives and may not be used without permission of Folk Music Archives and/or the Library of Congress American Folklife Center. All Rights Reserved. Unauthorized duplication or use is a violation of applicable laws.     Click On  NOTICE & COPYRIGHT

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